UC Berkeley
Visiting Scholar and Postdoc Affairs Program

2017 Conference

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
9AM to 1PM

UC Berkeley, 106 Stanley Hall

2016 Conference

Let's Have an Awesome Time Doing Science!

When: Thursday, March 24, 2016

Time: 9am to 12pm

Where: UC Berkeley, 245 LKS


Register ›

Schedule

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Speaker Title Time
Registration and Coffee 8:40-9:00
Introduction 9:00-9:10
Mikel Delgado Lessons from squirrels: What my research subjects have taught me about doing science 9:10-9:30
Jeanette McCarthy I left academia to become an educator 9:30-9:50
Hernan Garcia A random walk through physical biology 9:50-10:10
Coffee + Snacks 10:10-10:30
Christopher Alvaro blinded me with science: expanding notions of 'scientists' 10:30-10:50
Xavier Darzacq Single mRNAs to single Proteins: opening windows on gene expression regulation 10:50-11:10
Alison Hatt Alternative Uses For A PhD: Notes From A Career in Science Administration & Communication 11:10-11:30
Ulrike Heberlein The awesome adventure of genetics 11:30-11:50
Concluding Remarks 11:50-12:00
End 12:00

Speakers

Mikel Delgado

Mikel Delgado

Mikel Delgado is a NSF GRFP Fellow whose dissertation research examines the decisions that fox squirrels make when storing food, and the interplay between cache protection strategies, pilfering, and cognition. Her other research interests include the relationships between people and their pets, and how companion and wild animals can promote public interest in science. She writes about science and animal behavior at her blog, catsandsquirrels.com and for the Berkeley Science Review. Mikel is also a cat behavior consultant and co-owner of Feline Minds, a business that helps pet owners solve behavior problems with their cats. When she’s not wearing her scientist hat, Mikel is a DJ at UC Berkeley’s radio station, KALX, and obsesses over: her cats, reading dystopian novels, baseball, vegetarian food, and her bicycle.

Alison Hatt

Alison Hatt

Alison Hatt is the User Program Director at the Molecular Foundry, a nanoscience user facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. She manages the program responsible for bringing hundreds of researchers to the Foundry each year for collaborative, multidisciplinary research taking advantage of the Foundry's broad spectrum of staff expertise and state-of-the-art instrumentation. Alison also has a background in science writing and communication, and was previously a public affairs specialist for LBNL's Materials Sciences Division, where she facilitated communication between MSD scientists, their funding agencies, the "general public," and other stakeholders. She received her B.S. in physics from the University of Utah (2005) and her Ph.D. in materials from the University of California, Santa Barbara (2010).

Hernan Garcia

Hernan Garcia

Hernan Garcia is an assistant professor in the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and of Physics at UC Berkeley. He received a BS in Physics from the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina and a Physics PhD from Caltech. Hernan has explored diverse topics such as quantum optics, bacterial transcriptional regulation and developmental biology. He is a co-author of the book "Physical Biology of the Cell", enjoys teaching, and loves traveling.

Christopher Alvaro

Christopher Alvaro

Christopher Alvaro is a recent UC Berkeley Alum from the Molecular and Cell Biology Department. Currently, they are a STRIDE postdoctoral scholar at UCSF and hoping to continue in academia as a professor at liberal arts college. As a genderqueer activist, Christopher is dedicated to increasing and expanding diversity in STEM fields. During their time at Berkeley, they helped develop the Bridges to Baccalaureate program, which places community college students in Berkeley labs for 10 weeks during the summer. Aside from their dedication in academia, Christopher is also a performer and writer. They have written and performed a solo-show entitled "outside the wildtype," and regularly perform in drag under the alias Aequorea victoria. Christopher is interested in bringing these diverse ideas and concepts into STEM fields and classrooms and is honored to be a part of this year’s conference.

Xavier Darzacq

Xavier Darzacq

MCB Assistant Professor Xavier Darzacq tracks individual proteins as they navigate the nucleoplasm in living cells. With an award from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Darzacq brought his lab from France to UC Berkeley to apply his protein-tracking technique to healing in human skin. Wound healing entails differentiation of fibroblasts into muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts, which contract to help rejoin injured skin. But this process is sometimes impaired — the fibroblasts don't differentiate into myofibroblasts — leading to chronic wounds that fail to heal.

"We don’t understand why," Darzacq says, adding that a scratch can eventually lead to amputation of a foot due to defective myofibroblast differentiation. Besides helping people with chronic wounds, his work could give insights into regeneration of other tissue types as well as to how the fates of cells are decided in general.

Darzacq is happy to be part of MCB. "California is the best place on the planet for studying how a cell decides what kind to be," he says. "And UC Berkeley has a fantastic critical mass of labs working on gene expression and differentiation."

Jeanette McCarthy

Jeanette McCarthy

Jeanette McCarthy is a UC Berkeley trained genetic epidemiologist and spent the early part of her career in industry at Millennium Pharmaceuticals before transitioning to academia. She currently holds adjunct faculty positions at UCSF and Duke University. Her previous research had focused on the genetic underpinnings of complex diseases, both infectious and chronic. More recently, she has become a leading educator in the field of genomic and precision medicine involved in both health care consumer and provider education. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the first consumer-facing magazine in this field, Genome (genomemag.com), launched in 2014. She teaches genomic and precision medicine through UCSF and UC Berkeley Extension, and online through Coursera (www.coursera.org/course/genomicmedicine). She also designs and delivers workshops, symposia and webinars to various stakeholders through her consulting business, Precision Medicine Advisors (precisionmedicineadvisors.com).

Ulrike Heberlein

Ulrike Heberlein

Ulrike Heberlein is a Scientific Program Director and a Laboratory Head at Janelia. Her research uses the fruit fly Drosophila as a model organism to study the neural and molecular mechanisms underlying drug abuse and addiction. Heberlein received her BS and MS degrees from the University of Concepción, Chile. She received her PhD in biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, where she went on to conduct postdoctoral research in developmental genetics. In 1993 Heberlein became affiliated with University of California, San Francisco, starting as a principal investigator at the Gallo Center and an assistant professor in the Department of Neurology. Before coming to Janelia, Heberlein served as a professor in the Department of Anatomy.

Heberlein has received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers; the McKnight Investigator Award; the Byers Award in Basic Science, UCSF; and the Soloway Lecture Award, National Institutes of Health. In 2010, Heberlein was elected to as a foreign member to the National Academy of Sciences.